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Sports, Arts, and Entertainment Management

Degree Offered: Associate in Applied Science

Credits Required: 63/64 (2016-2017 Academic Year)

The Sports, Arts and Entertainment Management program enables students to acquire a broad understanding of the functional areas of business within the sports, arts, and entertainment industries. This well-rounded curriculum will set students on the path to success in the business world.

Program Outcomes

Graduates will be able to:

1.       Identify historically significant art movements and art works.

2.       Analyze business transactions and complete the accounting cycle.

3.       Demonstrate effective analytical skills

 

First Semester - 15 Credits

Code
Title
Credits
ACCT 110
Financial Accounting
3.00
The accounting cycle in various types of enterprises is examined. Included is the practical application of the principles learned. 3-0-3
BUSM 112
Principles of Management
3.00
This course provides an introduction to the roles and responsibilities of current day managers. It focuses on the basic functions of the management process - Planning, Organizing, Leading, and Controlling and on the application of these functions through case study application. (3-0-3)
BUSM 125
IntroSports Arts & Entr Mgt
3.00
This course will provide a broad overview of the structure of the sports, arts and entertainment (SAE) industries. Emphasis is on SAE as a business; it's marketing strategies, communications, programming, operations and facility management. 3-0-3
CIST 100
Introduction to Information Tech
3.00
A computer course designed to introduce students to personal computers. Topics include basic concepts of computer operations, storage media, software categories, Windows operating system, computer communication devices, and Internet. The course also includes introduction to Microsoft Word, Excel, Access, and PowerPoint. 3-0-3
WRIT 101
English Composition
3.00
Students will practice expository writing and learn the academic form of the essay and research paper. Students will focus on the development of an academically sound and challenging thesis and resulting essay. The mechanics of writing will be reviewed as needed. 3-0-3 Pre-requisite: Placement testing; successful completion of DEVS012 Reading and DEVS015 Introduction to College Writing if required, permission of the Division Director.

Second Semester - 15/16 Credits

Code
Title
Credits
ACCT 111
Managerial Accounting
3.00
This course is a continuation of Accounting I with emphasis on the use of accounting data in decision making, cost accounting and statement analysis. Prerequisite: ACCT110 3-0-3
COMM 201
Public Speaking
3.00
The emphasis is on speech preparation and delivery in a variety of speaking experiences designed to improve the speaker’s capability through the application of correct speech practices. 3-0-3
FINE 100
Art Appreciation
3.00
An appreciation of the visual arts, emphasizing the functions, styles, structure and media of art, art criticism, and performances is presented in this course. 3-0-3
LITR 210
Concepts of Literature
3.00
This course introduces students to the three major forms of literary expression: fiction, poetry, and drama. Significant works from each form will be analyzed to reveal creative techniques, how they represent an author’s time, and how they reflect today’s human condition. Prerequisite: WRIT101 or permission of the department.
MATH 129
College Algebra with Review
4.00
The functional approach to algebra is stressed with attention to the properties of the real number system; linear functions and equations; exponents; radicals; functions; systems of equations; and quadratic equations. Fundamental algebra concepts are reviewed and strengthened through assignments on MyMathLab. Additional topics may be added at the discretion of the instructor. Prerequisite: Appropriate placement score or appropriate high school records. 4-0-4
 
OR
 
MATH 130
College Algebra
3.00
The functional approach to algebra is stressed with attention to the properties of the real number system; linear functions and equations; exponents; radicals; functions; systems of equations; complex numbers; and quadratic equations. Additional topics may be added at the discretion of the instructor. Prerequisite: "C" or better in PREP021, appropriate placement score or appropriate high school records. 3-0-3

Third Semester - 18 Credits

Code
Title
Credits
BUSH 230
Event and Media Planning
3.00
This course introduces students to special event planning processes and techniques. Emphasis is on successful planning, organizing, identifying sponsors, marketing, implementing, and evaluating large scale events. 3-0-3
BUSM 205
Business Law
3.00
The principles of law are applied to business action including contracts, negotiable instruments, personal property, sales, real property, mortgages, leases, bankruptcy, and business torts. 3-0-3
BUSM 255
Macroeconomics
3.00
Macroeconomics examines the aggregate economy, with specific focus on unemployment, inflation, business cycles, and growth. Topics include economic reasoning, the economic organization of society, supply and demand, U.S. economic institutions, the world economy, national income accounting, money, banking, and the financial sector, the modern macro debate in reference to the aggregate production/aggregate expenditures model, demand management and fiscal policy, monetary policy, the debate about macro policy, the relationship between inflation, unemployment, and growth, international dimensions of monetary and fiscal policies, exchange rate and trade policy, traditional macro policy, supply-side macro policy, deficits and debt, and transitional economies. 3-0-3
FINE 101
Art History I
3.00
This survey class explores visual images and concepts from the Paleolithic Period to the Renaissance, placing special emphasis on the development of order and the use of space in Greek and Roman art and the religious application of art in the Early Christian Period as well as its influence through the Early Renaissance. 3-0-3
PSYC 101
General Psychology
3.00
This course examines the scientific study of behavior and mental processes and provides a survey of the major areas of psychology. Important topics and findings from psychology are reviewed. Topics include the role of science in the study of behavior, the biological foundations of behavior, learning, information processing, stress and health, social interaction, development, motivation, emotion and psychological disorders. 3-0-3
VISC 110
Understanding Media
3.00
This media literacy course is based on the media theory of Marshall McLuhan. Students will be introduced to what McLuhan believed to be the long term effects of using media on our bodies, psyches, and societies. We have created extensions of ourselves through the media we use on a daily basis. Any extension of ourselves affects the whole psychic and social complex. These extension are now global and intergalactic in scope, abolishing both space and time. Students will learn that in order to understand media, they must be able to understand themselves. By better understanding themselves, students will become better media creators, users, and communicators. 3-0-3

Fourth Semester - 15 Credits

Code
Title
Credits
BIOL 110
Human Ecology & Heredity
3.00
This course studies the interaction of man with his environment. Such topics as overpopulation, pollution, behavior, drugs, and evolution will be discussed in terms of how they affect the well being of man. Resource speakers and field trips will be an integral part of the course. No prior science background is necessary. 3-0-3
 
OR
 
PHYS 110
Introduction to Astronomy
3.00
This is an introductory course in the concepts of Astronomy. Emphasis is geared toward the student who wishes to acquire a beginning knowledge of astronomical phenomena. Topics are approached on a qualitative basis by the use of videos, classroom discussions, demonstrations, the World Wide Web, and off-campus activities. 3-0-3
BUSM 245
Principles of Marketing
3.00
The four P’s of the marketing mix, product, place, promotion, and price, are studied and applied to current market issues. The concepts and techniques used in product development, pricing tactics, promoting a product, and in choosing a distribution channel are outlined. Some of the quantitative aspects of marketing analysis are covered. 3-0-3
BUSM 256
Microeconomics
3.00
Microeconomics is the study of individual choice, and how that choice is influenced by economic forces. It considers economic reasoning from the viewpoint of the individual. Microeconomics focuses on the pricing policies of firms, households’ decisions on what to buy, and how markets allocate resources among alternative ends. Topics include supply and demand elasticities, individual choice and the foundation of supply and demand, production and cost analysis, perfect competition, monopoly, monopolistic competition, and oligopoly strategic pricing, competition in the real world, politics and economics and the case of agricultural markets, microeconomics policy and economic reasoning, government’s role in the economy, economic impact on the environment, antitrust and industrial policy, the distribution of income, the labor market, nonwage and asset income, international trade restrictions, growth and the microeconomics of developing countries, and socialist economies in transition. Prerequisite: BUSM255 or ECON255. 3-0-3
FINE 102
Art History II
3.00
This survey course investigates the history of visual images and concepts from the revival of Greco-Roman tradition during the Renaissance, through the styles of the rising nations during the Enlightenment, to the varied and conflicting ideas of the present. 3-0-3
SOCI 101
Principles of Sociology
3.00
This course provides the student with a general survey of the theories and concepts utilized in the field of sociology which contribute to a basic understanding of modern society and its structures. Key elements addressed within the course include the three foundational theoretical perspectives utilized in sociology, Functionalism, Conflict Theory and Symbolic Interactionism, the process of socialization, social institutions, such as family, marriage and religion, as well as an introduction to the basic research methods utilized in the field. 3-0-3